Archived Story

Garment printing business succeeding

Published 10:43am Thursday, August 8, 2013

MANCHESTER — Custom shop rags? Why not?

Jensales purchased a direct-to-garment printer in September 2012. The printer uses direct sublimation, and can print on almost any fabric, wood, glass or canvas.

A direct-to-garment printing machine enables Jensales to print cherished agriculture implement logos on shop rags.  --Tim Engstrom/Albert Lea Tribune
A direct-to-garment printing machine enables Jensales to print cherished agriculture implement logos on shop rags. –Tim Engstrom/Albert Lea Tribune

Paul Jensen, owner of Jensales, said the ink bonds to the threats so the image stands up well over time. This avoids cracking and peeling. The company is the only one in the area with direct-to-garment printing, with the closest competitor being in Rochester.

Jensales has worked on a variety of projects including jackets, guitar cases and product for local fire departments. The most unexpected item, said Jensen, is the shop rags they sell.

“We wanted to take something iconic and stand out from the crowd,” said Jensen.

The company makes them with tractor logos such as International Harvester, Massey-Ferguson, Caterpillar, Allis-Chalmers and John Deere, but can print almost any image onto the rags. Aside from tractor brands, Jensales has done business with a variety of companies including Du-Pont and racing companies that want rags for pit crews. Currently, they are making golf rags for Oak View Golf Course in Freeborn.

Jensales brings the rags with to tractor companies and goes through 200 to 300 per show. If a full set of tractor manuals is sold, they’ll give a matching rag to the customer for free, but many of them are also sold on their own.

“It’s neat to put good print on a piece of cloth,” Jensen said.

He added that the rags are not an expensive item, and people get a kick out of them.

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