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This Week in History: Albert Lea football team named Big Nine Conference champions

Local

Oct. 27, 2010: Major wind gusts caused problems for high-profile vehicles traveling through the area. A semi trailer blew over on Interstate 35 north of Albert Lea. The driver needed to be extricated from the cab, he was treated and released from Albert Lea Medical Center.

Oct. 29, 1970: President Richard M. Nixon was in Minnesota to campaign for Rep. Clark MacGregor, the Republican candidate for Senate. MacGregor introduced Nixon at Mayo Civic Auditorium in Rochester.

Oct. 28, 1960: The Albert Lea Tigers became Big Nine Conference football champions after defeating Red Wing 27 to 13 on the Wingers’ field. It had been 26 years since Albert Lea last won a Big Nine title in 1934.

 

National

2018: A gunman shot and killed 11 congregants and wounded six others at Pittsburgh’s Tree of Life synagogue in the deadliest attack on Jews in U.S. history; authorities said the suspect, Robert Bowers, raged against Jews during and after the rampage. (Bowers, who is awaiting trial, has pleaded not guilty; prosecutors are seeking a death sentence.)

2017: All but 10 members of the Houston Texans took a knee during the national anthem, reacting to a remark from team owner Bob McNair to other NFL owners that “we can’t have the inmates running the prison.”

2015: President Barack Obama, addressing the International Association of Chiefs of Police in Chicago, defended officers who had come under intense scrutiny amid a breakdown in relations between law enforcement and minority communities, and said police couldn’t be expected to contain problems that society refuses to solve.

2013: Penn State said it would pay $59.7 million to 26 young men over claims of child sexual abuse at the hands of former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky.

2012: Superstorm Sandy slammed ashore in New Jersey and slowly marched inland, devastating coastal communities and causing widespread power outages; the storm and its aftermath were blamed for at least 182 deaths in the U.S.

Oct. 30, 2005: The body of Rosa Parks arrived at the U.S. Capitol, where the civil rights icon became the first woman to lie in honor in the Rotunda; President George W. Bush and congressional leaders paused to lay wreaths by her casket.

2004: Four days before Election Day in the U.S., Osama bin Laden, in a videotaped statement, directly admitted for the first time that he’d ordered the September 11 attacks and told Americans “the best way to avoid another Manhattan” was to stop threatening Muslims’ security.

2002: U.S. Sen. Paul Wellstone, D-Minnesota, was killed in a plane crash in northern Minnesota along with his wife, daughter and five others, a week and a-half before the election.

Jam Master Jay (Jason Mizell), a rapper with the hip-hop group Run-DMC, was killed in a shooting in New York. He was 37.

2001: President George W. Bush signed the USA Patriot Act, giving authorities unprecedented ability to search, seize, detain or eavesdrop in their pursuit of possible terrorists.

In Washington, the search for deadly anthrax widened to thousands of businesses and 30 mail distribution centers.

The families of people killed in the September 11 terrorist attack gathered in New York for a memorial service filled with prayer and song.

1998: Sen. John Glenn, at age 77, roared back into space aboard the shuttle Discovery, retracing the trail he’d blazed for America’s astronauts 36 years earlier.

1996: Richard Jewell, cleared of committing the Olympic park bombing, held a news conference in Atlanta in which he thanked his mother for standing by him and lashed out at reporters and investigators who’d depicted him as the bomber, who turned out to be Eric Rudolph.

1994: Susan Smith of Union, South Carolina, claimed that a Black carjacker had driven off with her two young sons (Smith later confessed to drowning the children in John D. Long Lake, and was convicted of murder).

1976: Former Nixon aide John D. Ehrlichman entered a federal prison camp in Safford, Arizona, to begin serving his sentence for Watergate-related convictions (he was released in April 1978).

Oct. 31, 1941: Work was completed on the Mount Rushmore National Memorial in South Dakota, begun in 1927.

Oct. 29, 1929: “Black Tuesday” descended upon the New York Stock Exchange. Prices collapsed amid panic selling and thousands of investors were wiped out as America’s “Great Depression” began.

Oct. 25, 1910: “America the Beautiful,” with words by Katharine Lee Bates and music by Samuel A. Ward, was first published.

1886: The Statue of Liberty, a gift from the people of France, was dedicated in New York Harbor by President Grover Cleveland.

1881: The “Gunfight at the O.K. Corral” took place in Tombstone, Arizona, as Wyatt Earp, his two brothers and “Doc” Holliday confronted Ike Clanton’s gang. Three members of Clanton’s gang were killed; Earp’s brothers and Holliday were wounded.

1861: The legendary Pony Express officially ceased operations, giving way to the transcontinental telegraph. (The last run of the Pony Express was completed the following month.)

Oct. 26, 1774: The First Continental Congress adjourned in Philadelphia.